Category Archives: Leadership

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Athletic woman running on track

Goal Setting

Category : Leadership

1. Decide what you want. Your first step is to determine what it is you want to achieve. This can be a big change or small one, but taking some time to think about what you hope to achieve is an important first step to success.

2. Ask why. It’s important to take a little time to think about why you are setting the goals you’ve chosen. If you think about your motivations, you may find that you end up wanting to revise your goals
3. Brainstorm in writing. Once you’ve set a general goal, you need to start getting more specific and making a plan to reach it. A great first step is to do some free-writing. Get some paper and write down some thoughts about the following topics:

  • Your ideal future
  • Qualities you admire in others
  • Things that could be done better
  • Things you want to learn more about
  • Habits you want to improve.
  • This step is meant to help you fantasize and imagine many possibilities. After a few of these possibilities are out on paper, you can determine which ones are most important to you.

4. Get specific. Once you’ve thought about some goals and brainstormed a bit, its time to start getting more specific. Use your notes from the brainstorming session and your definitions from the previous section. Write down some specific things you would like to achieve or do.

  • A vague goal like, “I want to play better, so I will do my best,” is not as effective as a goal like “I want to be able to play my favorite song in six months.” Poorly defined end goals or vague “do-you-best” goals are not as effective as specific goals.
  • Move beyond general goals like “I want to become rich” and focus on specific achievements that will get results. Instead of “I want to become rich,” your goal could be “I want to master investing in the stock market.” Instead of “I want to play the guitar,” your goal could be something like “I want to play lead guitar in a rock band.”
  • It’s a good idea to do some more writing here, trying to describe your goals in as much detail as possible.

5.The Problem with How We Usually Set Goals. If you’re anything like the typical human, then you have dreams and goals in your life. In fact, there are probably many things — large and small — that you would like to accomplish.
That’s great, but there is one common mistake we often make when it comes to setting goals. (I know I’ve committed this error many times myself.)
The problem is this: we set a deadline, but not a schedule.

6.Make it happen! How do you do that? How do you really make personal accountability work for you? Wouldn’t it be easy if there were just some switch you could flip? An Easy Button you could push? Maybe an app you could use? Well, there really is a flipping magical switch-app-button. It’s called making a choice and acting on it. You have the choice to fulfill your aspirations or wallow in the blame game and victim cycle. True success doesn’t come from the outside but from within. There is no wizard. Taking greater personal accountability is the key to succeeding in everything you do.


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Overall Communication Skills

Category : Leadership

Being able to communicate effectively — in both written and oral forms — is an essential job skill at all levels within a company. Oral communication is the means that relationships are formed that allow the company to function as a team and work in harmony. Written communication is the fuel of the decision-making process, the information and analysis the business owner needs to run the company efficiently.
7  Ways to Improve Your Communication Skills Overall 

1. Look People in the Eye
Many people feel odd about looking intensely into others’ eyes. I personally find myself naturally focusing on lips in conversations, which can help in a noisy environment.

2. Smiling 
Good communication being with a natural smile to make nice situation. No one to speak with somebody that have tiger face. So you need to remember “Your natural  smile make the world dance “.
3. Never talk over people.
This demonstrates a real lack of respect. By talking over someone what you’re basically saying is “I don’t care what you’re saying—what I have to say is more important”.

4. Don’t finish other people’s sentences.
I used to do this a lot thinking I was helpfully finishing people’s sentences for them. Wrong. Research has shown by doing this you are dis-empowering the other person because you are taking control of the conversation, so bite your tongue!

5. Paraphrase.
If you want to show that you have really understood someone, then paraphrasing a great tool. All you do is repeat back to someone what they have just said, before you comment yourself. Here’s an example: “So Barney, what I’m hearing is that results are the number one objective for you right now and we need to find some fast solutions for you?”

6. Listen actively.
Focus on active listening instead of passive listening. The difference is that active listening means you engage and respond to the other person based on what they have said, passive listening is simply the act of listening with no response.

7. Maintain eye contact.
By looking the other person in the eye, you are proving that you’re interested in what they’re saying. This also keeps you focused and less distracted.

 


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art-of-leadership-02

50 Rules for Being a Great Leader

Category : Leadership

If becoming a great leader in your own business or organization is your goal, these 50 rules are a good place to start:

1. Listen to your team. Rule one. Always listen to what your team has to say, even if you don’t like it.

2. Communicate as efficiently as possible. Make your expectations and feelings clear, in the appropriate medium as often as possible.

3. Talk less. Sometimes saying nothing is better than saying just anything.

4. Be an example. Be the type of person you want your team members to be.

5. Be passionate. If you aren’t passionate about your business, you’re in the wrong business.

6. Be consistent. Be consistent in your behaviors so your team knows what to expect from you.

7. Make firm decisions. Don’t leave things undecided for long, and don’t waver about a decision once you’ve made it.

8. Identify mentors and role models. Find people you can look up to and learn from, and follow them closely.

9. Interfere only when necessary. If you trust your team to do good work, don’t interfere unless absolutely necessary.

10. Know your limits. Don’t extend yourself beyond your means.

11. Know your strengths. If you’re good at resolving disputes, step in and resolve them as often as possible.

12. Know your weaknesses. If there’s something you’re not good at, admit it, and work on it.

13. Don’t make excuses. If you make a mistake, take ownership of it and don’t pass the blame to someone or something else.

14. Accept the unforeseen. You can’t control or predict everything.

15. Choose your partners carefully. Work only with people you can count on and trust.

16. Do good. Commit yourself to being a good person and giving back to the community when possible.

17. Meet new people all the time. Take every opportunity to expand your network and expose yourself to new experiences and perspectives.

18. Stay in touch with your emotions. Don’t be a robot — let yourself feel.

19. Temper your reactions. Hold back your reactions until you have a moment to clarify your internal thoughts and feelings.

20. Have fun. Take the time to have fun with your team.

21. Research everything. Before making a decision, know the pros and cons — do your homework.

22. Think everything through. Never exclusively trust your instincts or first reactions.

23. Choose your team carefully. Hire only those you can trust to get the job done (and to get along with others, as well).

24. Prioritize your team. Your team is everything. Give them whatever they need to succeed.

25. Be humble. Don’t get big-headed about your wealth, influence or position as a leader.

26. Forgive mistakes. Everyone makes them.

27. Forgive yourself. Don’t beat yourself up too much over anything. Move on.

28. Be rational. Make decisions logically.

29. Be reasonable. Listen to dissenting opinions, and be fair.

30. Make time for what’s important. There’s no such thing as “not having time” for what’s really important in your life. Make the time.

31. Constantly learn. Read as much as you can, and take classes whenever you have the opportunity.

32. Improve everything. Work on improving your approaches, your skills and your processes constantly.

33. Never give up. Don’t throw in the towel when a little extra persistence could put you over the edge.

34. Transform your methods when necessary. If something isn’t working, change your approach.

35. Cut your losses when necessary. If you’re fighting a losing battle, retreat and start again somewhere else (or in a new way).

36. Learn from your mistakes. Try not to make the same mistakes twice.

37. Ground everything with data. Back up all your decisions, opinions and thoughts with hard, objective facts and evidence.

38. Don’t ignore signs of stress. Stress is real and can interfere with your ability to lead. If it starts setting in at abnormal levels, take action to reduce or relieve it.

39. Give feedback. Let your team know what they’re doing well and what needs further improvement.

40. Trust, but verify. Trust your team to get things done, but always follow up to make sure the work is completed.

41. Be approachable. Let people know they can trust you, and open your door to anybody who needs it.

42. Treat everyone equally. Don’t play favorites; it breeds resentment and makes you appear immature as a leader.

43. Don’t pursue close personal relationships with the team. Be on friendly terms, but don’t try to be best friends with everybody. You’re a leader, first and foremost.

44. Get the team together. Use team-building exercises or other excuses to get your team members talking with one other and having fun together.

45. Return favors. If someone helps you, make it your responsibility to pay back the favor — even if it’s years later.

46. Don’t burn bridges. Never cut a contact completely out of your life.

47. Stay in touch. If team members leave or change roles, stay in contact with them.

48. Don’t sacrifice your personal life. Your personal life is necessary to retain your own mental health. Never sacrifice it for the sake of leadership or professional responsibilities.

49. Enjoy leadership. Try not to stress too much about being a leader. Instead, enjoy all the benefits it offers.

50. Take advice with a grain of salt. Even with these 50 rules! Because nobody knows everything, and no one piece of advice applies to all situations.